Requirements For A GTD Home Office

Lately I’ve been spending time working on the third floor of my house, preparing it to be the ultimate productivity / GTD / geek lair. Well, at least as much of an “ultimate” room as current economic conditions allow. Anyway, like any good GTD practitioner, I’ve been doing some good brainstorming around how to make this space as GTD friendly as possible, and thought I’d share some of the highlights.

  1. A clearly accessible inbox
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    While I mostly use e-mail as my collection point, the need for the occasional use of paper as a reminder still remains. Now I’m not a fan of fancy, gold-plated desk accessories, so instead I found a great little wire-metal set at the local IKEA. Eight bucks and I have a great three-tray collection point. I’m thinking one tray for things to read, one for general collection, and one for… TBD I suppose, suggestions welcome.
  2. A functional way to archive materials, sans paper
    My @Reference folder is far and away the largest in my Outlook mailbox, as well it should be. But for those things like statements, receipts, magazine articles, etc, I’m thinking a nice, fast, feed-style scanner will do the trick. While I’m considering the Fujitsu ScanSnap, but its lackluster support of Linux may end that idea. I’m hoping to find a way to make indexed, search able PDFs from documents, so that I can easily find things based on search phrases like “December 2007 IRA Statement”. But that will be the subject of another post.
  3. A large white-board like surface
    While I probably can’t afford the real thing, I’ve read about using tileboard as a good (and cheap) replacement. Nothing beats it for broad, brainstorm-style thinking and planning, or loud reminders of some home task left undone.

That’s about it for the practical, now what about the impractical? Think about what you would want if money were no hindrance whatsoever. Maybe along the lines of the ultimate GTD dashboard? Picture a huge, 60+ inch LCD, touch screen display, permanently showing your Remember The Milk (or other suitable GTD tool) homepage. Now you really have no excuse not to know what needs to be done.

And why not see how the man himself does it?

So what’s your dream GTD office like?